Glad That’s Over

We have a new government, finally. Yes, they are strange bedfellows. Yes, they do not have the strongest backing. Yes, the odds are stacked against them. But they do have much in common. And if they can focus on the key issues that are for the benefit of the whole country and make progress bit by bit, who knows how far they might get.

It will be good to have a government that tries to pass a budget and tries to govern instead of trying to hang on to power so as to free Bibi from the troublesome nuisance of three criminal trials.

I confess to being entertained by the haredi parties screaming about the end of Judaism in Israel. Losing power (and money) was never going to come easy to them. Bibi’s criticism about Bennett’s (alleged) inability is unsurprising. But Bibi forgets he too had to start somewhere and he too was grossly underestimated.

I confess to being particularly happy for Yair Lapid. He has gone from strength to strength displaying qualities of perseverance, endeavor, honesty, self-sacrifice, and leadership. If he does become Prime Minister, he will deserve it more than anyone else in the current Knesset.

As for Bennett, I wish him luck. I want him to succeed, to make a difference and show what we can achieve if we work together, to be inclusive for the benefit of all instead of exclusive for the good of the few.

The rockets with no owners

This, from who else but the Guardian, is another example of their drip, drip, drip bias and demonization of Israel.

The rocket fire screwed up the hopes of a ceasefire all on its own! Nobody fired them. They were autonomous rockets…

Oh, come on Guardian. There was room for “by Hamas” in that title. But you deliberately chose not to blame your terrorist friends. Shame on you.

(An informed reader might know it was Hamas. But I wonder how many uninformed or lazy readers will read that headline and subconsciously at least blame Israel.)

The Guardian Doing What It Does Best

This article is classic Guardian propaganda. It’s a puff peace for terrorists that demonizes Israel.

Click the image to view the article

For example, only once is there mention of Hamas rockets. It’s hidden well down the content (23rd paragraph out of 26!) and – surprise, surprise – is couched in terms that suggest Israel is the aggressor:

“Among those who have raised urgent concerns has been the International Committee of the Red Cross, which has called on both sides to respect the urgent medical requirements of the people of Gaza. “In the past seven days in Gaza, we’ve seen extensive air strikes and also rockets going out from Gaza to Israel,” a spokesperson inside the coastal enclave told the Guardian.”

It’s almost an afterthought: “…and also rockets going out from Gaza to Israel.”

Not once does it say why Israel is attacking Gaza. Indeed, the ONLY actual mention of Hamas uses language that is so understated and lacking any import of violence, it is almost laughable.

“While Israel has accused Hamas in the past of using medical facilities as a cover for its activities…”

Activities? The Guardian makes it sound like an after-school club! Obscene.

How about this from a ‘spokesman for the Palestinian ministry of health in Gaza’:

“There has been a depletion of resources over the course of the year of the corona pandemic, and now this aggression has drained our limited health capacities significantly. We will be in a dangerous situation as a health system within days if this continues.”

It’s fair comment that Gaza’s medical resources are not in a good state. However, the Guardian doesn’t take the time to point out that it’s strange that the health resources have diminished while Hamas still has plenty of resources for war. You could do pretty well buying medical kit with the money that, for example, 2,000 plus rockets consumed.

Try this for size:

“Also among the facilities damaged on Sunday was a clinic run by Doctors Without Borders (MSF), which also said that a clinic that provided trauma and burn treatment had been hit by an Israeli missile in Gaza City.

 

Even before that strike, the MSF medical coordinator, Dr Natalie Thurtle, had warned of the danger facing Gaza’s already depleted health system. “The 14-year Israeli blockade on Gaza means that the health system here lacks many of the things it needs to treat people even during normal times,” said Thurtle last week.”

I have no idea about the strike. I am certain that Israel won’t have deliberately targeted the place, just as I am certain that MSF cannot be trusted. They have form in hating Israel. But put that tragic inevitability of war aside and concentrate on the blockade part. As any fool knows, including Thurtle, there is no ban on medical equipment. It’s an out and out lie. If there is a shortage of medical equipment, it’s because Hamas prioritizes military equipment. But does the article mention that? Not a bit.

Then try out this intellectual exercise. Assume for the purposes of discussion that there were a blockade against medical equipment even though there isn’t. We know that Hamas have managed to smuggle in Kornet anti-tank weapons. If they can smuggle in anti-tank weapons, for sure they can smuggle in medical equipment. They choose not to, in the same way they choose to spend money on instruments of war rather than medical instruments. The Guardian knows this, but they don’t – and won’t say it. Because to do so would remove some of the buffy shine that Hamas has accumulated thanks to years of propaganda and incitement against Israel by the Guardian and their ilk.

To be clear, I don’t want innocent civilians to die or suffer. But that’s what happens in war. If you don’t want dead people, don’t fire rockets at Israel. Simple really.

Make no mistake. The Guardian is at least partly responsible for every rocket fired at Israel. Reporting – and that’s a joke term – like this pours oil on troubled waters. The Guardian’s moral compass is not so much broken as shattered beyond repair.

 

 

 

A bissel of bias

The Guardian doesn’t have space to mention Hamas rockets.


The BBC makes it sound as if Israel is the aggressor. Of course.

Just a bissel of bias that these poisonous parties pretend is journalism. Instead, it’s campaigning for a cause and that cause is nothing to do with the wellbeing, security, or safety of Israel.

Under Fire – Again

During the last major Gaza conflagration, I was working in Yehud (near Ben Gurion Airport). On the single day that the missiles hit Yehud, I was working at home. Everyone wanted to know who my Hamas contact was.

Fast forward to the latest mini-war, and as the rockets rained down on Ra’anana and associated central belt cities, I was on a short break up north. It was quiet and there were neither missiles nor trouble. I have just returned from the north and I see the peace loving neighbors of Hizbullah have started firing rockets there. Quite a coincidence.

As you will have gathered, it’s important to maintain a sense of humor.

I did think about composing a long serious blog post putting right all the utter garbage most of the western media is putting out, but there seems little point. People will believe what they want to believe, sadly. Few will actually question the drivel on offer.

The fact the media lie, lie, and lie again – and I can point you to examples should you wish – is only part of the issue. They also mislead. And by doing so, alongside the arsonists disguised as human rights organizations, they fan the flames of war, of hatred, and of a bloodthirsty need to see more dead Jews. It’s almost as if they don’t like to be reminded of the long European tradition of Jew hatred. It’s almost as if it never went away. It’s almost as if the mask has slipped for good.

Happy Seventy-Third Birthday Israel!

And so we move from sadness to celebration.

I just finished watching the official ceremony. The main part was the beacons being lit by representatives from all parts of Israeli society. Each story was an inspiration. Each dedication delivered from the heart.

I still don’t feel comfortable about the switch from despair to joy that these two days bring. Maybe I never will. But that feeling doesn’t last long as it is replaced by the sheer unbridled pride and joy that comes with being able to celebrate Yom Haatzmaut in Israel. I’m so glad to be here.

Happy seventy-third birthday Israel. Many happy returns.

Taken

Yom HaZikaron starts tonight.

Starting with a haunting, lingering, trembling siren, we remember the 23,928 taken too young – regardless of their age – in defense of their country and their people.

I hope and pray that peace will come one day soon, and the number of the dead will be fixed forever as a permanent reminder of their sacrifice and a past left behind.

Responsibility

As you may have heard, Israel’s Mediterranean beaches have been devastated by a crude oil spill. The environmental damage is severe, the beaches closed, and there’s a ban imposed on seafood from the Med. In short, it’s a disaster.

Who is responsible? Well, as I type this there are several tankers under suspicion and presumably at some point we’ll be told the culprit who leaked the oil. But it turns out there is another culprit closer to home.

The Times of Israel reports (here):

“Way back in 2008, the government decided to formulate a National Plan for Preparedness and Response to Marine Oil Pollution Incidents. A cabinet decision, made in June 2008 when Ehud Olmert was prime minister, ordered that within three to five years from January 1, 2009, the ministry would fill staff positions and acquire all the equipment and sailing vessels it needed to prevent oil contaminations at sea.”

You can guess what’s coming, can’t you?

“The ministry was instructed to discuss with the Treasury any funding needs it could not meet on its own, in the run-up to the 2009 budget. And the environmental protection minister at the time (Gideon Ezra of the now-defunct Kadima party) was ordered to ensure that the plan was enshrined in law, along with the requirements of the International Convention on Oil Pollution Preparedness, Response and Cooperation, to which Israel is a signatory.

That sounded positive, didn’t it?

Unfortunately:

But the plan never made it into the law books. And the Finance Ministry effectively blocked the transfer of additional funds.

So, there was a plan, but it was never put into action. I’m sure we’ll get some waffle, but the simple truth is that our government failed us. Whether they were lazy, incompetent, or didn’t care about the issue is unknown. But the result is. A quick trip down to the beach – but be careful you don’t breathe in too many of the fumes – is all that’s needed.

According to Wikipedia, these are the responsible ministers:

I anticipate each will have a reason for public consumption as to why the plan couldn’t be executed. Perhaps the reason will include (other than for Gila Gamliel) the excuse that they were just about to take action when their term in power ended. Right…

But in the time we’ve had six or seven Ministers of Environmental Protection, we’ve had one Prime Minister.

One man, in power all this time, who surely could have enacted the plan, who could have put it into force. But Bibi didn’t. It’s almost as if the most important thing on Bibi’s mind was staying in power rather than doing the best for the country and its people.

If Bibi were a responsible adult, he would resign. This incident alone should shame him into falling on his sword. It won’t. He has to go.

Once upon a time, twice upon a time…

This is the large poster outside a new building development in Ra’anana.

The Hebrew text on the right side translates to:

“Launch of the second boutique building in the heart of Raanana”

My inquisitive nature wants to know where the first is. I guess it’s already built and fully sold.

Meantime, did you notice the glorious strapline (or motto) in (sort of) English:

I suppose I should wonder what happened to “Time one live.” Is it a band? Is it a motto? No, it’s some silly bugger who thinks he knows English.

Really? In a city overflowing with native English speakers, a commercial undertaking doesn’t have the ability to get a simple three word motto right? It’s awful. But it’s far from unusual. By way of protesting, I’m refusing to even look at the show flat. (Ha!)