Returning to Holland

Well, I finally got to play Holland ’44. (This well illustrates my challenge: too many games, not enough time.)

It’s worth noting that I put this on the table after a debate came to life on ConsimWorld, driven by queries from David Hughes for an article he was researching. That set off a burst of book reading by me, and then I got out the game and played it through.

I only played it once, and the Allies got thumped. But it was fun. It was cool to see how Mark Simonitch handled various aspects of the battle, and how the narrative developed.

I had no problems with the rules. The components were, as usual, gorgeous, and the system is one I find to be playable and immersive.

The potential criticisms raised in the online debate included suggesting that units in the game can cover greater amounts of territory than they could in real life. While I think that’s true, there are several responses.

First, it’s a common ‘failing’ of many wargames, because designers are so wedded to the concept of zones of control.

Second, in the game it doesn’t seem to materially interfere with the historicity of the overall flow. In other words, it doesn’t matter.

Third, it’s easy to apply some house rules and see the impact. For example, I set up a mini scenario that applied a no ZOC rule. Wow, that was wild and very different. But it opened up some possibilities.

So, another good game from Mark and GMT. That won’t stop me listening to the ongoing debate, and waiting for David’s article.

 

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Holland ’44

Newly arrived, this is Mark Simonitch’s game about the Market-Garden Campaign in WW2. It uses 8 hour turns with units of battalion (and company) size. There are two sheets of counters, one main map and a small extension. Based on a quick flick through of the rulebook, it seems to be about the same complexity level as his previous games Ardennes ’44 and France’40. To me, that makes them about 4 or 5 on a rising complexity scale of 1-10.

It joins the ‘to be played’ queue.

Two points of note.

First, the campaign didn’t take place in Holland. Mark confesses this in the rules, but is comfortable that marketing won out over accuracy in this case. For what it’s worth, I don’t agree, and I dare say if I was from Holland – a part of the Netherlands – I might be more vocal in my opposition.

Second, this is one of the most gamed about topics of the era. So, it will be interesting to see what fresh perspectives Mark brings to bear. I was delighted to see he quoted John Butterfield’s Hells Highway as a landmark design which Mark looked to as a sort of benchmark. Hell’s Highway is one of my all time favorites. I do wish, though, somebody had taken the HH system and rolled it out for other WW2 actions.

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