Between Games

First, an apology to Efrat. In the report of last week’s session, I should have mentioned that she brought the Manhattan Project game we played, and I also should have thanked her for bringing it. So, belatedly, thanks Efrat!

Now onto my report of this week’s session.

Azriel, Peleg, and Sheer came along and we started with a new game to all of us: Between Two Cities. It’s a tile placement game with shades of 7 Wonders. The neat thing is that you build two cities, not one, sharing one with the opponent to your left and right. Your score is the lowest city score you have.

The game is played in three rounds, with a hand of tiles dealt to you in each round. (The middle round has duplex tiles which are somewhat trickier.) There are different types of buildings, each with its own scoring mechanism. Neat. You choose (secretly) two to play, and pass on the rest. Then, after placement, you pick up those tiles you have been passed, choose two, pass on the rest, and so on.

A city – but not a high scoring one!

The game is fast, and I suspect has greater depth than we gave it credit. For example, since you know the pool of tiles, you can guesstimate what the other players are holding and likely to play so as to improve their cities.

The scores were close, but Sheer’s two cities were top and that made his lowest score the best score. I think what was also interesting is that we played without table talk, and that smoothed and sped up play. I want to try this again.

While I remember: this game also game with a unique set of starting player cards. You draw randomly, and it tells you how to determine the starting player. For example, alphabetical by city of birth. This is a neat idea that is, of course, available to use for all games. Maybe I will adopt it as the house standard.

Then, an old favorite: Dominion: Dark Ages. We took five basic action cards and five from Dark Ages to give a slow, smouldering deck. I went for a money strategy and an early finish. Sheer and Azriel were using Rampage and Pillage cards, and Peleg was doing that too, but with a bit more variety. My strategy paid off just in time, as I was able to finish the game and claim the win by a mere two points.

We ended the night with a three handed game of Eight Minute Empire while Peleg busied himself on a conference call with Bill Gates, Larry Page, and Warren Buffet. Sheer had never played this. After playing it, he described it as ‘the worst game I have played in a long time’ so I don’t think he’ll be playing it again soon.

It was Azriel whose play was spot on, and he handily beat Sheer and me. Once again, he professed to not understand the set scoring. Once again, he scored the most for his sets…

As an aside, Sheer’s comment reminds me to note that every gamer has his own style of game that he likes or dislikes. For example, when we played Santiago, Efrat said she disliked auction based games. And then there’s my own dislike of complex abstract games. Then again, for every game we hate there will be many gamers who love it. It’s a funny old world the world of gaming. Thankfully!

Thanks to all who came and made the night so much fun. We had a lot of laughs.

Share:

Water, water, everywhere…

This week’s session started with a five player game of Eight Minute Empire. Roy and I had played it before, but the game was new to Avri, Azriel, and Efrat. Although Azriel said he was struggling with the concept of a set, I should have remembered the lad has form in the field of misdirection. And so, once again, the youngster won, albeit just one point ahead of Roy. As expected, it was a tight game, proving this is a nifty little filler game.

Next up, Santiago. This is a 2003 game featuring a specialized turn order auction mechanic combined with tile placement and bribery. (Efrat, midst game, said she dislikes auction games and wouldn’t be rushing to play it again. I sympathize.) Avri and I had played this before, and there was a brief rules introduction before we started. There’s a lot you can analyze about the game and the value of your decisions (assuming matters work out as you think…) and Avri is well skilled in doing exactly this. Of course nothing turned out the way I had hoped, and my bold strokes turned out to be foolish foibles. Such is a life in games, sometimes! Anyway, Avri saw everything turn out well for him, and he was a relatively easy winner, with the rest of us a bit behind.

It’s early in the game, but already things don’t look good

With Roy departing to save the western world, that left four of us to plot how best to build an atomic bomb or two.

Yes, the theme of The Manhattan Project: Chain Reaction is to build weapons of mass destruction. It’s a card game version of a successful board game, and cuts the action down to simple bare-bones card combinations. You have a hand of five cards, each with one or two workers of different types, as well as resources. You must choose how best to use each card, and how best to use that card in conjunction with another card. For example, one card might have two scientists and a enrichment plant. Which should you use? The two scientists can be combined with some yellow cake to get you uranium. But maybe it would be better to use the enrichment plant. And so it goes. Fun. Fast. A good filler. Avri won just ahead of Efrat. Azriel and I were too busy enjoying the game play to think about anything as sordid as winning the game…(Ahem.)

A good night. Thanks to all who came.

Share:

Eight Minute Empire

Despite the misleading title, this is a decent filler game that does a good job of synthesizing some worker placement themes into a fast, fun, and thoughtful challenge.

It’s designed for two to five players, and the game length varies according to the number of players. If you are super fast, you could finish a two player game in under ten minutes, but I would guess most games will take 30-45 minutes.

There is a double sided board, allowing you to choose what map you want to play on. Each is split into continents and areas. All players start in the same starting area (with three armies) and then the game begins by laying out six cards. The first player chooses a card, plays any price, executes the action, and the player’s turn is done.

You start with a set amount of money that has to last the game. Each card has a price according to its position in the row, varying from 0 to 3. If you run out of money, you have to take the ‘0’ card. Each card has an action – introduce new armies, move armies, build a city, or eliminate an army – and a commodity. At the end of the game you get victory points for areas controlled, continents controlled, and sets of commodities. Control comes from having the most armies plus cities in an area.

You can only add new armies to the start area (which is where every player’s army starts) or where you have a city. And you can build a city where you have an army. That means you need to think about when and where (or if) you want to take a turn to build a city.

The key trick in the game is to watch the available cards, work out what you need, work out what your opponents need, and take the card that best advances your position whilst least advancing your opponents’ positions. You are unlikely to get stuck with analysis paralysis, but the decisions are not always easy.

Susan and I played this a couple of times, once with a third (novice) player, and enjoyed it. It’s a very good example of a filler game, with a nice balance of luck and skill, and is highly replayable, even if it will take you more than eight minutes to play.

Share: