Total English?

In short, no.

The following appeared on a Ra’anana building fairly recently. (It’s still there as at the time of posting.)

Expect correct English?

This rubbish arises because it’s a direct word for word translation from the Hebrew way you would say expect more. The lack of a capital letter after the full stop is, so to speak, the icing on the cake.

In a country brimming with native English speakers, this is inexcusable from – presumably – a professional company; whether Total-E or their marketing people, they should have done better.

As far as I can tell, it’s some kind of gym/fitness venture. For their sake, I hope their business is more fit for purpose than their marketing.

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Eurovision, Israel, and Hamas

And let’s not forget Islamic Jihad…

Eurovision 2019 is done and dusted. For Israel, it appears to have been a huge success. Notwithstanding the sniping from the usual suspects, the event passed off without a major hitch, and injected a real buzz into the Tel Aviv scene for the best part of the week up to and including the final. Supporting events were so popular, the police made public appeals for people not to attend as they were already overcrowded! While much of the crowds were locals, anecdotal evidence suggests that tourists also had a great time. Given the western media’s hunger for anti-Israel stories, it would appear the anecdotal evidence is more persuasive than usual. Continue reading

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Silence is not golden

Or, what you won’t see reported by the BBC, the Guardian, the Independent, the New York Times, and too many others to name.

The Times of Israel reports here on the ‘Nakba demonstrations’ in Gaza, Judea, and Samaria.

Here’s what you wont see in those not so fine examples of the media:

In a speech at the border area, senior Hamas official Fathi Hamad, known for his fiery rhetoric, warned Israel that “The day of your slaughter, extermination and demise is approaching.

“We came to tell the Zionist enemy, its men, army, government and Knesset: ‘Go away from us,’” he said.

“All of you should look for a place in Europe…hell, the sea, the ocean or in the Bermuda Triangle. There is no place for all of you in Palestine. There is no place for you in the land of Jerusalem. There is no place for you in the Al-Aqsa Mosque, Jaffa, Haifa, Acre or any place.”

What a charmer.

Of course, this is precisely the context that they don’t want to highlight for fear it contradicts their ‘Israel is wrong’ narrative. So they won’t. All part of the invidious campaign they wage to demonize, delegitimize, and denounce Israel. All rock solid proof that when it comes to liberals, they can be as hypocritical and hateful as right wing extremists.

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Yom Haatzmaut

Susan bought us a present for Independence Day (which starts tonight).

The Simpson Family Flagpole!

This is another of those strange occasions in Israel, when the mood moves – without pausing – from somber reflection (Yom HaZikaron) to joyous celebration (Yom Haatzmaut). Although I am still uncomfortable with the switch, I recognize the advantages of the sequence. And, by the time tomorrow we join most of the country, gathered round the traditional mangal (barbecue) the discomfort will have passed. Life goes on. Otherwise, the sacrifices made were in vain. And for sure, they weren’t.

This Yom Haatzmaut, we’ll have our Israeli flag flying high.

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At the going down of the sun

In a few minutes, the sirens will pierce the evening skies across Israel as Yom HaZikaron begins, the day on which we remember those who have given their lives for Israel, whether as soldiers in combat, or as victims of terrorism.

The hope of us all is that from this day until next year’s Yom HaZikaron, there will be no names added to the list of the deceased; no more bloodshed, and no more dying. That’s our prayer. That’s our wish for the future.

Meantime, at the going down of the sun and in the morning, we will remember them.

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Predictions and Gaza

Background: When the disengagement from Gaza was first mooted, I wasn’t in favor. However, at the time I wasn’t yet an Israeli citizen, and as part of my general principal of not wanting to be an armchair Zionist who criticized Israel from the safety of the Diaspora, I said nothing.

Smart cookie that I am (cough, cough), when the proposal became a plan that was going to be implemented, I thought I could see the vision. I thought there might be an advantage: the disengagement would give the Palestinians a chance for self government. And if they were daft enough to try any silly business, the IDF would flatten them, and nobody can say they didn’t deserve it. That was my prediction. Wrong!

It doesn’t matter what Hamas does; Israel will always be condemned for its military response. (I think that’s a prediction, too. Oh dear.) If that’s correct, what conclusions might reasonably be drawn? Tricky.

Perhaps we should consider the disengagement a mistake, own up, and accept it. Perhaps.

For now, I am going to finish here with a simple hope that the carnage stops sooner rather than later without further bloodshed. My heart goes out to the communities riven by loss and dreadful disruption – they are living in a war zone – who have learned what we all truly knew: Bibi’s deterrent does not exist. The emperor has no clothes.

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Never again, or always the same?

It’s Yom HaShoah (Holocaust Memorial Day) in Israel. Always a difficult day.

Here’s one perspective:

Israel HaYom, May 2, 2019

The article (from Israel HaYom ) connected to the pictures is entitled:

“Europe was anti-Semitic and will remain anti-Semitic – the answer is a strong State of Israel”

The text then goes on to add:

“The Europeans like to put the responsibility for the Holocaust on the Germans alone, and to [conveniently] forget how the rest of the “enlightened” continent cooperated enthusiastically with the Nazi extermination machine. They did not give up hatred of the Jews, but instead camouflage it as hatred of the State of Israel”

Or, to put it another way, anti-Zionism is anti-Semitism.

The bottom article reports on President Rivlin’s speech last night. He commented about how Europe was haunted by the ghosts of the past.

And of course Bibi’s speech got a mention, too. He said that contrary to what happened in the Holocaust, this time around Israel is building alliances against a dangerous regime (Iran).

(In Bibi and Rivlin’s speeches, there were undercurrents and some give and take about Israel’s ties with some less than pleasant regimes, but that’s for another time.)

Bibi’s speech underlines why some (emphasis is on “some”) people see him as the only one who can defend Israel. The not so small irony is that the violence around Gaza escalated last night. First the peace loving residents of Gaza launched friendly firebombs into Israel (at least one destructive brush fire was started). The IDF responded with air attacks. Then the pacifists of Gaza upped the ante by launching a couple of rockets. It certainly doesn’t look like Bibi deserves his reputation on that score.

While we remember the victims of the Holocaust, contemporary events force us to look into the future and wonder if “never again” is a certainty, or a possibility. Has Europe got over its anti-Semitism? Will it ever?

Israel is strong, but the struggle is never-ending.

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Body Count – Barbara Nadel

Another evocative murder mystery set in Istanbul, this decent crime novel mixes the hunt for a serial killer with the personal ponderings of Inspector Ikmen and Commissioner Ardic. Both are getting old and retirement is on the agenda. Their internal musings – occasionally verbalized to the supporting cast – are a strong part of the fine characterization on show. Both are rounded, interesting, and complex individuals who act as the author’s voice, delivering some nuanced (and some not so nuanced) observations on life in Turkey.

The plot involves a clash of old and new Turkey, with views of the underclasses and the downtrodden to remind us that outside the warm and hospitable homes of the heroes, there are many places a lot less friendly and pleasant. The gritty realism portrayed is matched by the no nonsense approach to the violent acts which interrupt the stalled investigation.

At times the book slows down too much and seems to lose its way. Just at the point where it starts to get annoying, the pace picks up again. I couldn’t decide if this was intentional or otherwise, and maybe reflected the need to make the narrative more realistic given real life police work is jam packed with long boring stretches of slogging. The writing is no slog, but the pacing means that you do have time to enjoy the view.

You could read this as a standalone novel and enjoy it. If you do, there are many more to read and also enjoy – perhaps even more than this one. If you are a serious reader, I recommend skipping this for now, and starting with

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Something missing…

I’ll give you one guess what’s missing from this report.

Click the image to view the story. It’s not pretty. It’s not complete.

OK, I’ll tell you. It’s the parts of the tirade the woman gave that referred to her work for the Palestinians and the BDS movement. (See here, for example.)

No need to tarnish those noble (ahem) causes with the drunken insults of this lout, is there?

No need to do anything to interfere with the Guardian world view which says – in effect – the Palestinians and their supporters are perfect.

What a crew of bastards they are!

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The Bottom Line

It sure isn’t the top line. You don’t get the western media spelling this out. You just get – in the main – excuses for terrorism and demonization of Israel.

Notice, we are talking about looking from the perspective of their leaders. It’s not clear what the ordinary Palestinian wants.

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