Truth in Advertising

This is the Twitter motif of activist group IfNotNow:

And this is how it would look were there to be a truth in advertising law:

If anyone’s looking for source material to back up the above, I suggest taking a look here. (The Elder of Ziyon shows how every point made by the group in a Twitter feed about Gaza, the Palestinians, and coronavirus is a lie. Quite some achievement.)

I’m inclined to agree with the description of IfNotNow as a hate group. It’s the only rational explanation.

 

Headline Failure

Guess who the Guardian blames for Gaza’s Covid-19 challenges?

The correct headline for this article would be:

“Can Gaza cope with Covid-19 after years of wasting money on rockets instead of investing in its civilian infrastructure?”

But there’s no chance of the Guardian printing the truth. Not when it comes to Israel.

If only the Gazans loved their own people more than they hated the Jews.

Celebrate BBC – Bye Bye Corbyn

Oh joy. Celebrate like it’s 1979. The bad man has gone away. The good man – and I’ll come back to that – has triumphed.  But first, some random thoughts.

  • This campaign stiffened my dislike of the Guardian. Any institution that can admit the Labour Party had a serious problem with antisemitism but still recommend people vote for it is a deeply flawed body.
  • Chief Rabbi Mirvis got his intervention spot on. The last thing he would have wanted to do was become involved in national politics, but he believed it was wrong to stay silent. His noble behavior in the face of the storm of criticism directed his way after his statement simply cemented the belief (sic) of many, that he’s a decent man doing a difficult job very well. Long may he continue.
  • One response from the losing side has been slinging mud at the Tories suggesting that they have a problem with Islamophobia. Expect more of the same. I also expect Boris to put his own house in order, as required, and to deal swiftly with any such instances that arise.
  • I registered for a postal vote. I’m still waiting for the ballot to arrive. (Thank you Israel Post!) It would have taken another 6,000 votes like mine to see off the SNP who, sadly, took Renfrewshire East.
  • The election is a bad result for Scotland. It’s created a false expectation of independence that the SNP cannot deliver. I presume Johnson will stand resolute. So far as the rationale is concerned, there is no longer an economic argument for Scottish independence. And there is no prospect of Europe wanting Scotland as a member without the rest of the UK. Despite those inescapable facts, it seems likely that there will be a huge waste of time and energy and money – public money – wasted on campaigning for an independence referendum.
  • The markets do not like uncertainty. Well, this election result should sort that out. Whether you like it or not, Brexit is going to get done.
  • Note the following quotes from Dominic Cummings which should make uncomfortable reading for many:

“After the shock of the referendum MPs and journalists should have taken a deep breath and had a lot of self-reflection of why they misunderstood what was going on in the country but instead a lot of people just doubled down on their own ideas and fucked it up even more. That’s why something like this happens against expectations.

All these better than average educated remainer campaigner types who have waved around for eight weeks, for the last four months and didn’t understand what was going on and didn’t understand they were driving everyone mad.

Hopefully now they’ll learn because it’s not good for the country, the whole dynamic to carry on. MPs need to reflect, the media needs to reflect and they need to realise that the conversations they have in London are a million miles away from reality.

Finally, Boris. I have never met him, am never likely to, and have no burning desire to make him out to be a hero. He can be very clever. He can be nasty. He can be entertaining. He can be cruel. He can be charismatic. He can be sly. In short, he is not perfect. But none of us are. And many of those who sling stones are too quick to criticize (and name call) instead of arguing principles, ideas, and so forth. They shoot first and think later. He is also not a dictator. He has a party to keep him on track and, more importantly, an electorate who will not forgive him if he fails to deliver on his promise to be the Prime Minister for everyone. (For the many and not the few?) In this case, I am an optimist. I am happy to leave the PM alone and let him get on with the job.

Bye bye Corbyn, and let’s go Boris!

If Bibi were a statesman

Statesman

noun, plural states·men.

  1. a person who is experienced in the art of government or versed in the administration of government affairs.
  2. a person who exhibits great wisdom and ability in directing the affairs of a government or in dealing with important public issues.
  • If Bibi were a statesman, he would resign.
  • If Bibi were a man of honor, he would resign.
  • If Bibi cared about his county more than himself, he would resign.
  • If Bibi cared about his party more than himself, he would resign.
  • If Bibi were a mensch, he would resign.

Right now, Bibi is none of these. Or, at least is not behaving like one of these.

For another perspective, read the material that argues otherwise: that Bibi should not resign. It seems to me that almost all of these articles are hero worship pieces along the lines of Bibi is the only man who can run the country, defend Israel, and keep it safe. Or, Bibi is the only one responsible for all the good things we have now in Israel, and he is the only one who can keep doing more of the same.

This is simply untrue.

Putting to one side the fact that cemeteries are full of irreplaceable people (and no, I don’t mean Bibi belongs in a cemetery), is Bibi’s record so good?

Do the residents of Sderot and the south have peace?

Do the parents of the two soldiers whose bodies Hamas hold hostage think Bibi is so good?

And while some want to give Bibi the credit for the strength of the economy, that wholly overlooks the weaknesses: we have people in work who cannot make ends meet. We have a housing crisis because homes are too expensive. We have horrific levels of property. The economic hero part also overlooks the contribution others have made to some of the stronger parts of the economy.

And let’s not forget Bibi’s horrendous anti-Arab racist statements and incitement.

Bibi is no legendary figure. Yes, he has achieved some good things. But he neither deserves the credit for them all, nor deserves to use them as a cover for not resigning.

How can he be at his best when he has to focus on defending himself in court?

Finally, what about the allegation that the charges are a left wing conspiracy? Let’s remind ourselves that the Attorney General – no shrinking violet or left wing sympathizer – was a Bibi appointment. That’s why Bibi’s supporters say Manderbilt is a dupe. Of course, he’s nothing of the kind. He’s an honest man, trying to do the best he can. That’s not something you can say about Bibi.

If Bibi were a statesman, he would resign.

No excuse for racism. Not even for Bibi.

Last week, the Elder of Ziyon posted an article: How to explain “racist” Netanyahu’s unprecedented support of Arabs?

The story claims (probably correctly) that Netanyahu governments have given substantial preferential treatment by way of aid to Israel’s Arab minority. And done without claiming credit or publicity.

Why? The Elder dismisses other explanations and offers the following:

Which brings us to the real answer.

Netanyahu has a vision for Israel’s strength and security for the next century. That is, and has been, his paramount goal. He cannot accomplish that goal without winning elections – the opposition parties simply do not share his strategic vision, if they have one at all.

To win elections, Bibi has to sometimes appeal to the less liberal elements of his party and of Israeli society. If he doesn’t win, in his mind, Israel loses.

Bibi’s supposed “racism” is public – he doesn’t give a damn if people think he is racist because if he doesn’t win, nothing can be done to help Israel in his mind. His true attitudes towards Arabs are revealed by what he does behind the scenes, and the anecdote that the article begins with shows that he has done far more to help Arab society in Israel than any previous prime minister from any party.

Do you buy that? I don’t.

Read the whole thing to make sure I am not misrepresenting the position.

The Elder’s position appears to be that it’s OK for Netanyahu to be racist – which he undoubtedly was – because, in the long term, the end (Bibi’s rule) justifies the means. That is irresponsible and dangerous. Die hard Bibi fans like the Elder can try and excuse his dreadful behavior, but ultimately they must fail because there is never an excuse for it. Never. It’s plain wrong. Would we excuse antisemitic behavior from anyone?

As a separate issue, Bibi’s achievements are not all they are cracked up to be, and his failings are many. I do not fall into the camp that demonizes Bibi, but this almost deification is way off base.

On this point, the Elder and I see things very differently.

Elections and Peace

This post was triggered by a comment I saw on Facebook:

“There will never be peace while Netanyahu has a thread of power or influence.”

While I am unsure if I would go as far as the commenter, I understand the source for that view and can sympathize with it. However, I felt that it was also a comment that reflected how the media, in the main, see the situation. It’s a variation on the theme, “It’s all Israel’s fault.” Wrong.

I therefore posted the following:

“There will never be peace while Abbas has a thread of power or influence.”

 

“There will never be peace while Hamas has a thread of power or influence.”

These are the parts the world forgets. (Sometimes, because it suits them.)

To conclude with the final perspective, I also posted this:

“Hopefully, today’s election results will remove Bibi from the picture. If so, we’re still stuck.”

Which is the real point. Israel has a vibrant democracy. We may not all want Bibi, but he was elected the leader. If he wins again, we have to respect the decision and hope he steers the country in the right (sic) direction. But even if Bibi loses, and Ganz becomes Prime Minister, the prospects of peace are no better.

For example, with Ganz as PM:

  • What do you think the prospects are for the Palestinian Authority or Hamas being more likely to be able to deliver peace?
  • What do you think the prospects are for the media blaming the PA or Hamas for the lack of peace?
  • How long do you think it will be before the media start parroting a line like this:

“There will never be peace while Ganz has a thread of power or influence.”

In short, while I would welcome a change from Bibi, I see no Palestinian partner for peace. I’d like to see peace or progress towards it, but on the basis of the available evidence, I am pessimistic. However, I’m reasonably certain Israel will be blamed, no matter what! Blaming Bibi is lazy thinking, for it fails to consider the whole picture.

You have to laugh

Laughter is the best medicine.

I suppose if you have been brought up to believe that it is fair, reasonable, and right that people’s life and liberty should be sacrificed solely in the interests of demonizing the Jewish State, it’s no great leap to sacrifice the chance to visit your grandmother to keep the fires of hate burning. What a great example of citizenship that is!

Oh, and in case you missed it, the Obama administration banned an Israeli MK from entering the USA in 2012 for his extremist views. Sauce for the goose… Pretty rich of those USA parliamentarians to cry wolf now.

Who ran from Iran?

The cartoon in today’s Haaretz made me smile:

The Hebrew says “Who is the commander?”

Quite.

It didn’t take much to work out that Iranian activity in the Straits of Hormuz would be directed towards British interests. It’s unclear if the Royal Navy has the capacity to protect all such interest, but my guess is that it’s not possible. Smaller, faster attack boats and helicopters can run rings round frigates and the like. So, Britain is stuck. Banning its own ships won’t go down well. (Though insurers may effectively bring about that result.) A military response is unlikely. Either Britain caves – a diplomatic disaster – or it weighs in with its own sanctions and gets ready for the long haul.

Or a war breaks out between Iran and the US. And maybe with the Europeans. I hope not.

On a related point, I do remember Obama or Kerry hectoring Israel about what would happen if Iran broke its pledges under the nuclear deal. Why, the sanctions would snap back. Israel had nothing to worry about.

Well, Iran broke its pledges and the sanctions by the Europeans are unsnapped. So, if Israel were relying on the Europeans to keep them safe, they would be wasting their time. In this regard, Bibi is right.