All at Sea

Flying Colors, designed by Mike Nagel, was originally a self published design. It’s a game about fleet actions in the age of sail, focusing on the higher level perspective and speeding up play by cutting out a fair amount of lower level detail. GMT published it in 2005, followed by an expansion (Ship of the Line) and two more complete games: Serpents of the Seas (a 2010 release about naval battles of the American Revolution and War of 1812) and Blue Cross White Ensign (a 2014 release about the Imperial Russian Navy).

There was a second edition of Flying Colors released in 2010 and just this year a new third edition. GMT offered an upgrade pack for those who had earlier versions of the game and I duly acquired it.

The upgrade includes all the stuff that was in the Ship of the Line expansion as well as all the scenarios and all the ships and leader counters required to play the campaigns and scenarios that originally were published in C3i magazine. It’s a bumper package nd it inspired me to get the counters cut and the game on the table.

To start off, I played Minorca – the encounter between Admiral John Byng and a French fleet on 20 May 1756 that ultimately led to Byng’s court martial (for failing to press his perceived advantage against the enemy) and death by firing squad.  In my replay, the French secured a win after the British took heavy losses in closing for the kill. (They captured one French ship, but several of their own struck their colors after being dismasted and left to drift.)

As usual, the early turns contained a fair amount of checking the rule book. But, soon enough, I was able to cut down those references to the rules and ran the game mainly from the provided player aid cards. It’s a veritable marker farm – though you can all but eliminate these if you want to use rosters – but there’s plenty of space, and it for sur beats individual logs for each ship. It’s highly playable solitaire, so my powers of replicating schizophrenia were not unduly challenged.

The high level perspective is more than enough to give you a sense of the historical setting and potential strategies and tactics. And there are are a huge number of scenarios with small, medium and large encounters. Also, Serpents of the Seas introduced a duel system that deals with single ship v ship encounters and adds a deck of cards to the mix. That’s less playable solitaire, so I have nothing to say about it beyond that I’d like to give it a try, face-to-face, sometime.

After Minorca, I started and am currently finishing off the battle of Sadras. The real event took place on 17 February 1782 between Admiral Edward Hughes and his British fleet trying to impose their rule over the Indian Ocean and Bay of Bengal and the French under Admiral Suffren. I think the British are going to win this one.

I like this system a lot. It gives you a sense of the historical time and place and a taste of the challenges facing the respective fleet commanders. It’s not complex, and there’s plenty of scope for house rules for those who want more detail. One of my current top ten wargames and highly recommended if you are at all interested in naval history.