About that war on drugs…

From the Times (behind a paywall):

“At nearly 22 [drug-related] deaths per 100,000 people, Scotland’s death toll has overtaken the United States and is now three times the UK average.”

According to the article:

“A deadly cocktail of opioids and “street valium” is driving drug deaths in Scotland, which now has the highest mortality rate in the developed world.”

Scotland, you have a problem.

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Dark Sacred Night – Michael Connelly

Michael Connelly has a great track record as one of the finest crime writers of all time. This is not his finest hour. (If you are looking to start on a Connelly book, don’t start here!)

The problem is that the book features one of his oldest and finest characters – long in the tooth angry old detective Harry Bosch – and one of his newest – newcomer Detective Renée Ballard. What comes across is that the author is tired of Bosch and wants to finish him off. However, it appears he doesn’t feel confident enough that Ballard is a strong enough character to generate the same loyalty. So, Connelly is keeping the pot boiling. Unfortunately, to do that this time around, he delivered a decent enough tale but one that lacked the fire and passion I would have expected.

The story, such as it is, involves Bosch dragging Ballard into a cold case. (Is there any other kind, he half-joked.) Both are trying to find out who murdered Daisy Clayton, a 15-year-old runaway, back in 2009. The back story is good, as is the characterization on an individual basis. But it lacks sizzle. The plot doesn’t excite, rarely surprises, and sort of limps along. One red herring takes up an inordinate amount of time and space to no great effect. Bosch seems to be less of a whole character without his daughter. And Bosch and Ballard don’t spark the same atmosphere when they are working together. It lacks chemistry.

The ending was a bit of a disappointment. Rarely would I have thought that was even possible for Connelly.

All in all, it was OK, but not up to the standards I would expect from this author. Good, but not good enough.

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Every landing should have one

On the way back from a meal at a friends’ apartment, I decided to walk down the stairs as partial atonement for overeating. I know that storage space in modern homes is not exactly extensive, so I wasn’t surprised to see household bits and pieces on various landings. This, however, somewhat stands out.

Motorbike and electric scooter. Every landing should have one of each.

What would you think of that if it were in your apartment building?

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On the beaches at Normandy

This game, one of my ConsimWorld Expo purchases, is about the Normandy Campaign in WW2. Published by Decision Games, it was originally a magazine game (Strategy & Tactics) designed by Brad Hessel, featuring only the Cobra part of that campaign. It has gone through a couple of updates and upgrades of campaign coverage by Decision, of which this newly released boxed version is the latest, led by Joe Youst.

What you get inside the box are two standard maps, 280 die-cut counters of decent quality, a rulebook, and a separate campaign study booklet, as well as dice and some plastic storage bags. Continue reading

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Scrublands – Chris Hammer

This is a terrific novel which packages a complex plot, finely observed characterization, decent dialog, and a well crafted (albeit stark) backdrop and produces as fine a novel as you are likely to read. It’s simply wonderful.

Set in the Australian outback, the background is that one year previously the priest in small town Riversend shot dead five of his congregation before one of the local policemen shot and killed the priest. As the novel opens, a somewhat bedraggled and PTSD suffering journalist, Martin Scarsden arrives in town to do a follow up feature. Scarsden’s work discloses something different from the previously reported version of what went down. From there on, matters accelerate out of control as Scarsden discovers his mission to get to the truth has ignited some serious opposition.

Scarsden has his own personal issues, but he also suffers from business challenges given that his employers are looking to cut costs and keep their media outlet operating. I get the impression Chris Hammer is campaigning a wee bit for the journalism profession, but in a way that does not detract from the authenticity of the portraits nor the entertainment value of the story. In other words, he does not overdo it – it’s simply another fine feature among many.

The author constructs such a clear sensation of the oppressive heat and the listlessness of the environment that you may find yourself drinking lots so as to keep cool! The realities of life in a small outback town, struggling with drought, unemployment, and the challenges of just getting through day-to-day life are sympathetically displayed. Similarly, the characters draw you in so that it doesn’t take much imagination to put you in their place.

It’s also noteworthy that despite the intricacies of the plot, the author never loses control. Each strand is distinct, logical, and well thought out. The coming together of all the loose ends is handled with aplomb. I found it a thoroughly immersive experience.

One of the best books I have read, ever. Yes, it’s that good.

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Red Badge of Courage

This game was on the table before I went to ConsimWorld. It contains two battles – both at Bull Run – and is part of a long running series (probably one of the oldest) called Great Battles of the American Civil War (GBACW*). The series started with Richard Berg’s groundbreaking design Terrible Swift Sword about Gettysburg, published in 1976 by Simulation Publications Inc. (SPI). Generally, these are tactical games with regimental sized units and hexes of 100-150 yards, and some form of command and control mechanism.

The series is now hosted by GMT, and other designers have utilized the core features to extend its life. Red Badge of Courage dates back to 2001, but this was the first time I had broken it out and played the game. Previously, I had spent most time with Three Days of Gettysburg, Berg’s updated version of Terrible Swift Sword, sometime in the late 1990s.

After bringing myself up to date with the rules, I played through the first Bull Run main scenario a couple of times and thoroughly enjoyed myself. It uses chit pull which makes it solitaire friendly. And, although the rules are a few iterations out of date, I didn’t come across any major issues. (There were some clashes in the orders system with formations getting March orders and wanting to come out of that order, but I worked something out that seemed to fit well.)

CSA cavalry force Hunter’s marching troops to partially deploy for combat

So far as the battle was concerned, on both occasions the CSA managed to hold up the Union forces well enough to claim victory. I suspect it needs a higher level of skill to get truly successful attacks. But it was still fun. I was more interested in reconnecting with the series, as there is a chunky eight battle package due out from GMT soon, and I am very keen to play that. The smaller battles are more attractive for all sorts of reasons, though I do still hanker to have another bash at Gettysburg.

Tyler in reserve

It was also interesting to compare this system with MMP’s Line of Battle (LOB) output. I do prefer certain aspects of LOB, and wonder how easily they could be adapted into GBACW. For example, LOB’s closing to contact and defensive volley are so much quicker to process than the standard, step by step, unit by unit approach of GBACW.

Jackson marching to the sound of the guns

Expect to see more GBACW posts in the future.

(*You can see all the GBACW games here.)

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Cannabis

This falls under the ‘You learn something new everyday‘ category.

From ‘Can Cannabis Fix the Opiod Crisis?‘ in the July 2019 issue of Scientific American:

“…These polarized views can, in part, be explained by the drug’s complexity: cannabis is not a single substance, but rather a mixture of more than 500 individual chemicals whose proportions vary from one plant strain to another.”

That complexity (and the fact that most cannabis is prepared for the illegal market) is also one reason why it has proven difficult to draw clear research conclusions about whether cannabis is good for you or bad for you.

Fascinating.

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