More Guardian Hate for Israel

And, not so incidentally, more antisemitism.

See this story:

The Guardian turning an antisemitic tweet into bashing Israel

Here’s the Guardian engaging in outright demonization.

See how far you have to read in the article before finding out the facts.

The facts?

  • Japan spends more on lobbying. Articles by the Guardian on that – none.
  • Korea spends more on lobbying. Articles by the Guardian on that – none.
  • The Securities and Investment lobby spends more than seven times the amount spent on pro Israel lobbying. Articles by the Guardian on that – none.
  • The Real Estate industry lobby spends almost four times as the amount spent on pro Israel lobbying. Articles by the Guardian on that – none.

Oh, and I have seen it suggested that the ‘pro-Israel’ amount quoted includes J-Street. Two issues with that. First, it’s by far the biggest contributor. Second, it’s pro-Israel the same way that Abbas is pro peace. In your dreams, pal.

So this hit piece turns an antisemitic tweet into an exercise in bashing Israel.

It ignores the undoubted antisemitism. No excuses. (That bigot didn’t spot antisemitism according to Guardian. She ignited a controversy!) Just ignores it. Then, it leaps out in a not so brave new direction of propaganda spite.

Or, to put it another way, it picks out and unfairly discriminates against the Jewish state.

The Guardian.

Guardians of anti-Israel hate.

Guardians of antisemitism.

Guardians of a world view that abhors the existence of the Jewish state.

Somebody break the news: we’re here to stay.

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Killing by Silence

TOI coverage of Ori Ansbacher's murder

The death of Ori Ansbacher is a terrible, shocking event.

Away from the clamor of calls for the restoration of the death penalty, or the stormy, noisy row over whether to deduct payments from the PA, there is another area where her murder has been met with a deadly silence.

As of now, her death has been ignored by the BBC, the Guardian, and the Independent. Not one word. (Funnily enough, all have covered the latest casualties in the Gaza riots.)

That silence is a killing silence.

That silence ensures that the media consumed by the western world is unbalanced and unfair.

That silence is part of the demonization of Israel. Minimizing Palestinian terror reinforces the (false) narrative from the media that Israel is to blame for everything, and the Palestinians are innocent, oppressed, and deserved of sympathy.

I do not seek to minimize the deaths of Palestinians. Whatever the Gaza rioters were doing, all deaths are to be regretted. But the silence about poor Ori’s murder – while covering every Palestinian casualty – is as hateful, as poisonous, as evil as any piece of antisemitic bilge from so called pro-Palestinian supporters. Arguably, it’s worse because the reach of these media platforms is so wide, so extensive, and so insidiously persuasive.

To put it another way, had Ori been a Palestinian, her death would have been front page, worldwide news. But the death of a Jewish girl at the hands of a Palestinian terrorist? That’s not news.

That silence is a killing silence. It kills the prospects for peace and reconciliation. It kills the chances of even handed treatment in the eyes of the world. It kills by piling further pain on the family who see their daughter’s life rendered as of no value, as insignificant. It kills because it empowers extremists on both sides. It kills the lie that such media is honest and impartial. It kills the belief that liberal media have good principles and moral standards. It kills the belief that western liberals have good principles and moral standards – I mean, where’s the outrage, guys? That silence is a killing silence.

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Zion’s Fiction

I am a fan of science fiction and fantasy literature, preferably in novel form. All too often, the short story form neither excites nor interests me. There have been some exceptions, but generally I keep away from short stories.

As you may have guessed, Zion’s Fiction – a collection of Israeli fantasy and science fiction short stories – was an exception. It wasn’t only that I wanted to support this venture, but also that I knew almost nothing about the local fantasy and SF scene, and this was a perfect opportunity to start learning about it.

The Foreword (by Robert Silverberg) is fine.

The Introduction (by editors Sheldon Teitelbaum and Emmanuel Lottem) is informative, but a real slog. It’s a touch too much of the high brow, and also seems focused on squeezing every last one of the editors’ pals and acquaintances in. The worst part is that it did not engage me. The writing seemed limp and lifeless, with an absence of humor. I’m sure some others will love it.

Most of the stories were OK, but truly no more than that. There wasn’t one that made me think ‘Wow, I’m really glad I read that.’ Unfortunately, there were a couple that made me think ‘Wow, I’m really sorry I wasted my time reading that.‘ In short, a big disappointment.

The best of the stories, to my mind, is Keren Landsman‘s Burn Alexandria. (I believe Keren, who writes in Hebrew, has a novel coming out in English this year from publishers Angry Robot.) Perhaps this seemed better because it’s one of the longer pieces and had time to develop more fully. The end, however, was exactly as I anticipated, and left me somewhat underwhelmed.

Probably the best known author of the lot is Lavie Tidhar. His The Smell of Orange Groves reminded me of work by China Mieville. That’s not a good thing. The story did not work for me. It came across as half an idea, half a dream, and wholly missing the entertainment point. Not for me, old boy.

The Afterword by Aharon Hauptman is spot on: short, snappy, and to the point. Well done that man!

I am sure – he said, entering optimist mode – that there are many great pieces of Israeli science fiction and fantasy out there. But none of them are in this book. At least I bloody well hope not.

Avi Katz‘s illustrations are OK, and the cover is clever.

But the best thing about it? The title.

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