Don’t Let Go – Harlan Coben

This is a standalone book which shows the author deploying his well developed technique of presenting a tragic event from one perspective, and slowly revealing what actually happened. Coben is a master at this genre, and he’s on good form here.

The tragic event is that fifteen years ago, teenagers Leo Dumas and his girlfriend, were killed by a train. Did they commit suicide? If so, why? They had everything to live for.

The first person narrative is given by Leo’s twin, Nap (short for Napoleon) who is a policeman with a vigilante streak. He has never given up on getting to the truth. In the present, as Nap tells it, things began to unravel in their community, and the common thread seems to be the death of the two youngsters and some mystery they may have been investigating.

This is a neat bit of storytelling, with a central character that is fairly well rounded, though far from Mister Straight Laced. The plot, as usual, is brilliantly revealed, and the twists are often fast and furious.

The major downside for me is that it all felt familiar. The characters may have changed, and the plot materially different, but the overall impact is the same as in many of Coben’s other books. They are all variations on a theme – good ones, but still variations. So, it was enjoyable, and definitely a good read, but I am looking for the author to stretch himself a bit more. This type of book is too much within his comfort zone.