The Deepest Grave – Harry Bingham

This is book six of the series featuring Fiona Griffiths, a very singular police detective character. The five preceding books have been, on the whole, excellent. I wondered if the author could maintain the quality. Having read the book, I can confirm the character is still as engrossing, and the portrayal is top notch. However, this time around I didn’t feel quite the same connection between our heroine and the deceased, and the plot was way beyond far fetched. However, it was still a great read.

The story begins with a murder. Not your average murder, but one involving the beheading of an archaeologist with nary an Islamist in sight. Fiona is on the case, and soon she has worked out what is going on. Unfortunately, her colleagues Рespecially her boss Рis going off on a different investigative direction. Inevitably, the tension builds up, and there is more danger for Fiona to face.

So, on the plus side, the main character is an absolute corker, and is brilliantly and sympathetically described.  Some of her colleagues are a bit too cliched. The baddies are a bit trickier for me to rate. I thought that some of the scenes featuring the main criminal were good, but the motivation and plausibility were a bit lacking. The plot is tight in the sense that it is logical, but I found it wholly implausible.

The book was still a page turner, but just couldn’t match the quality previous books. I must stress that it is not the case of the author going off track; simply that this is a good book that is not quite as good as the others.

One interesting aside is that the book includes an essay by the author explaining – almost justifying – why he writes about such fanciful crimes. He claims to follow the Arthur Conan Doyle line in preference to the Raymond Chandler one. I wasn’t sure I completely understood the necessity for the essay, nor its likely effectiveness, but I did enjoy seeing how the author was thinking about matters.

Bottom line: I’ll be buying the next one, for sure!

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