How to fix a record player

Depending on your perspective, the following is either a story of cultural differences, or my well embedded anal retentive type nature. You decide.

I have not posted anything about my record collection for a while, because my beloved record player wasn’t working. I pressed the button, but the turntable wouldn’t move. I checked the power supply, but I knew that was OK as the turntable light was on. So, I turned it off, then on, then off, then on. No joy. I tried it at 33 RPM and 45 RPM. Still no joy. I unplugged the turntable, and looked at how easy it would be to take it apart. It looked too difficult, and I wasn’t that confident that I would know what to do, even if I did get it open.

So, the record player stayed where it was, broken, and waiting for me to get round to dealing with it. And my record collection stayed unplayed.

It remained like this for months, until Sarah-Lee and Tomer mentioned this hi-fi store in Givatayim by the name of Fuse. It had proper listening rooms to try out audio kit before you buy it, sold and repaired every imaginable piece of audio kit, and seemed to offer a professional, reliable service. More importantly, they said they could fix a Linn turntable.

Aside. I thought that Linn had an Israeli distributor. But when I went to the Linn site and tried out Israel in the Find a shop feature, this is what I got.

My nearest authorized Linn hi-fi store...

My nearest authorized Linn hi-fi store…

I don’t think I’ll be going there in the near future…

Meantime, back in Israel, we arranged a trip out to Givatayim with the record deck. I took it into Fuse. I told the guy serving me what the problem was: the record player is not working. Can you fix it?

He plugged the record player into a power source. He turned it on. You could have knocked me over with the proverbial feather – the damn thing was working. The turntable was turning! I protested that it had not been working. I think he believed me. Then, he turned it off. Then, he turned it on. This time it id not work. The turntable stood defiant and still, not moving. Aha. Vindication!

I told him that this was how it was when I tried it at home. I clicked the on button, the light went on, but nothing happened.

At this point, he did something I would never have done: he gently nudged the turntable platter, encouraging it to move. It moved. It worked. He turned it off and on again. Again it refused to move. But once more, he gave it a little nudge, and it was fine. He put a record on to make sure it was working, and it was. He told me that whatever the problem was, it was not worth opening up the delicate insides.

I was astonished. I would never have thought to do anything like give the platter a push. If you turn the damn thing on, it should work without needing a push. Obviously that only applies outside of Israel…

Anyway, I now have a working turntable, and I am back playing my records again. With a nudge…

 

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