Five Broken Cameras

The film appears to be a fairy tale:

Once upon a time, a poor Palestinian farmer lived in a West Bank village called Bil’in. He had four sons, a doting wife, and many friends. A few of the men worked, while the women spent their days cooking, cleaning, raising children and otherwise being invisible. The men smoked, danced, watched soccer games and occasionally picked olives. Life seemed perfect. One day, big bad Israelis erected a “barrier” through Bil’in, seemingly for the sole purpose of irritating the villagers. For the next five years, chronicled through the life of the farmer’s youngest son, the farmer and his friends nonviolently protested this fence. Some got hurt and some even died because of Israeli soldiers’ unprovoked and excessive use of force. Then, because of the villagers of Bil’in, the fence came down. Moral of the fairy tale: Israelis are bad; Palestinians are good; the farmer’s son is very cute and has tragically suffered his loss of innocence because of Israel.

Yeah. Right.

Get your essential dose of context and reality from the Algemeiner, here*. It may come in handy when the topic of the film comes up for discussion in the pre or post Oscar media buzz. This excerpt is worth remembering:

This film is not about the fence. It is actually part of an ongoing effort to deny Israel’s right to defend its citizens with non-violent security measures like the fence. The film also underscores the difficulty Israel has in finding a true partner for peace. If Israel cannot find peace seekers among those who profess to be the ordinary people of Palestine, like Emad, then who will meet Israel at a negotiating table already forsaken by Palestinian terrorists ruling Gaza and the self-proclaimed “moderates” ruling the West Bank?

[*When I read the article, the headline was “Fairy Tails Won’t Bring Peace: Five Broken Cameras and the Palestinian Farce.” That’s surely right, because fairy tails will certainly not bring peace. But neither will fairy tales…]